Resident Evil 3 Remake Complete

Last night, and after only two play sessions (though the 2nd was admittedly longer) I have completed the main campaign for Resident Evil 3. I didn’t really read reviews or look into anything about the game before purchase, mainly because it looked like it was the same sort of remake treatment that its predecessor got. I didn’t really pay too much attention to the news cycle around it, but I guess it did turn out that people were complaining about a “large” chunk of the game being removed from this version. Something about a segment in a clock tower, but I’m not entirely sure what that entails because I didn’t play the original version. There are references to the clock tower and I captured it in one of the screenshots I took while playing, but you definitely don’t visit it. I’m not sure how much that takes away from my overall enjoyment because I don’t really know what I’m missing. Things I liked about this title were the same things I liked about the last remake. It’s over the shoulder shooting fun and it’s so far above and beyond what the older games could do that I enjoyed the ride. My only real complaint is that it was a relatively short experience, but if you want to be a completionist to unlock all of the achievements and/or in-game unlocks there’s more time to be spent.

The missing link?

It was more difficult in some parts than its predecessor, but I still managed to get through most of it without frustration. I also enjoyed the way that you swapped between controlling Jill and Carlos throughout the story rather than playing through the game another time to see other parts, though that decision also cut down it’s length. There’s also the packed in Resistance that is an asymmetrical co-op thing I still haven’t tried and really am not all that interested in. I’ve gotten what I want out of the game and though it is a little disappointing to have a title this short cost full price, I still think it was worth it for me. Whatever the case, I enjoyed it, but if you have played the original perhaps you should skip it. If you’re simply a fan of the series like I am, you’ll likely have a good time, but I’d advise maybe waiting for it to drop in price. My playtime ran just under 7 hours.

I will say that Nemesis was the star of the show, and some of the fights were not overly difficult but still interesting and cool. Just like in my Resident Evil 2 playthroughs, I was presented with an end result screen which details some stats. I didn’t do all that well, and could probably manage a better score but again, I’ve had my fun with it for now.

One good thing about the Resident Evil series is that it has been evergreen for me. I have played some of these titles multiple times, through various difficulties and earned various achievements and honors throughout. I can always come back to visit Raccoon City at a later juncture and still get enjoyment out of it, simply by turning up the difficulty or aiming for particular in-game challenges. Someone other than myself has probably already worked through most. Your mileage may vary.

Resident Evil 3 Remake: First Playthrough

Despite being a huge fan of the Resident Evil series, I somehow never played through the 3rd installment. For this reason I was very happy to learn the game would get the same remake treatment that Resident Evil 2 did last year. It came about faster than I had anticipated though, and released this past Friday. I just so happened to get paid that same day so I decided it would be my gaming purchase for the month. Quarantine has kept me locked in doors giving me more time to play through these games so I gladly invested in my entertainment future. I should note that back when Resident Evil 6 released I picked up the Anthology edition that contained codes for downloading all of the games on my Playstation 3. However, these were just the PSOne Classic versions, and though I had intended to try and play through it back then, I just never got around to it, and going back to PSOne graphics is tricky. Honestly I think this is the best way for me to experience this part of the series that I originally missed. I can already say that it has bridged some of the gaps in story that I lacked when playing some of the newer iterations.

The introductory sequence starts out in first person perspective, and I thought that was pretty cool. I really loved Resident Evil VII in which the game was pushed into the first person space, and so this was a nice touch. However the game switches to the traditional over the shoulder viewpoint rather quickly. You’ll start out playing as Jill Valentine, who was a member of STARS and introduced in the first game. She was absent from Resident Evil 2 though you can imagine that these events were happening around the same timeline, as she is in her own apartment and the conspiracy board in the background shows that she has started to put together Umbrella’s involvement in the events of the first game. Obviously by the time the events of RE2 transpire, the virus would have spread from the manor/lab to Raccoon City. This also means that the events of RE3 have to be happening around the same time, though Leon and Claire are dealing with things in and around the police station while Jill is out in the larger portion of the city. From here there will be some spoilers, only because I want to share some cool parts of the game along with screenshots, and if you haven’t played this 20 year old game yet, then welcome to the club. Come back after you’ve finished it. Otherwise, enjoy the ride.

It doesn’t take long to be introduced to the main villain, Nemesis. He’s a hulking brute that uses tendrils to grab you and pull you towards him, but later comes in additional flavors. He pops in and out of your playthrough, is impossible to actually kill, and makes life difficult for our protagonist. Soon he’ll pop up with a flamethrower, and later he’ll sport a rocket launcher. He’s a bastard, and every time a cutscene makes you believe that he’s dead, there he is again. Eventually you’ll run into a guy named Carlos who later becomes a playable character, and his organization works for Umbrella, but seems to be ignorant to the fact that his company is responsible for this mess. His commanding officers are dicks, but one does give his own life to save yours, so there’s that. I reached a point where I escaped the city and took over playing as Carlos, who was heading into the RPD building, so perhaps more of the story gaps will be closed between games.

The gameplay loop in generally the same as other Resident Evil games. You’ll find a multitude of herbs, ammunition, and craftable items, along with books, notes and scribbles that give more insight to the lore of the game. Eventually you’ll have a plethora of guns, but never enough ammo. I’ve found this game to be more challenging than its predecessor, but also more challenging than the newer games as well. You really don’t get enough ammo to deal with the amount of enemies, as each take way too many shots to dispose of. Then as you progress through levels some will respawn, so it really is beneficial to simply run past those enemies that you can. You’ll also do a ton of running away from Nemesis, so I suppose that’s the intended loop. Overall the game looks and feels just as good as the last remake, but because the story is something I knew nothing about, it has pulled me in even more. Honestly these past two remakes and RE7 are my favorites of the series to this point. I enjoyed 4 solo, and really liked the co-op features of 5 & 6, but these remakes just feel so much better. Modern conveniences and all. Regardless, I love the series, I’ve loved these remakes and I look forward to where the series goes next with the next proper sequel.

Thoughts on Teppen

Seeing advertisements all over the Internet is a common thing. Be it while browsing websites, seeing adverts on social media, or even within the apps we are already using, these things are everywhere. I happened to catch wind of a new game called Teppen due to one of these advertisements, and initially ignored it. Licensed IPs or no, I won’t always fall for the usual trappings of these targeted ads. After seeing it several more times though, I found myself at the Google Play store page, and well, I downloaded the game.

Being a game featuring many of my favorite Capcom characters, I thought this might actually be a licensed game that could actually be good. It’s supposed to be a card game utilizing these symbolic characters, but it doesn’t play like the typical digital card games I’ve played previously.

So above is the battlefield. As you can see, there are familiar concepts here as you have your hand down below, a mana bar that is more similar to Hearthstone and a life total one either side of the characters who are fighting. What’s different, is that your character isn’t really fighting, more like just waiting for their special ability to charge (the AP meters in the corners) and then you can do some various things including direct damage to creatures or the enemy character. Otherwise, the combat is done via your cards, and are typically other characters from Capcom games that have various power and life points. When placed on the battlefield, an arrow will slowly travel towards the enemy from the unit you placed. If there is another card placed directly across from it, the cards will damage each other. If there is no blocker, then you damage the enemy general. That’s really all there is to it. I’m sure other depth might arise due to having different characters to play as, but overall it was very simplistic and not something I see holding my attention.

After a few battles  you’ll get to the main menu, which functions like most mobile game menus do. There are various currencies used to buy things, “Hero Stories” where you’ll play characters through several missions and learn more about them. Missions are like dailies. There are other various modes that allow for PvP and those that provide additional challenges. I can see that there’s plenty to do here, but with the core gameplay loop being so boring, I couldn’t be assed to go any further.

I just figured I’d share my thoughts about this one to hopefully prevent someone else from wasting their time.

RE2: Leon Campaign Complete

The last time I spoke about this year’s Resident Evil 2 Remake, I had just started the game and was gushing about it’s “new nostalgia” factor. Since then, I have wrapped up Leon’s campaign and started on Claire’s, already nearing the underground passage portion of the game. After clearing the first “chapter” so to speak, I came to find out that they really packed in a bunch of new game plus stuff into this remake. Originally thinking about only Leon and Claire’s campaign, I figured this was a maybe twenty hour game at best.

It turns out that my first run at RE2 took just under nine hours. I’ve probably played Claire for about two, so I should be clearing it in about six more. That’s near that original twenty hour mark I mentioned, and as it turns out there are “2nd Run” campaigns for both characters, along with a “Hardcore” mode that doesn’t autosave and has stronger enemies/less supply drops. I hear there are alternate “real endings” after the 2nd Runs, and apparently you’ll have to do all this stuff if you’re achievement hunting.

I’m not sure what will happen. I’m really enjoying the game thus far, but I’m likely to move onto something else after I finish Claire’s campaign. However, that does leave something to come back to, since those runs are supposed to play out a bit differently and show you the true ending so I think I’ll have to come back to it. I know with Resident Evil 5 & 6, I played through them time and again, partially to earn trophies but also because my best friend and I could co-op through them. When it came to Resident Evil 7, I played alone and I only played through once. I don’t see myself wanting to binge through the game another two times so immediately, but I do see myself checking them out further down the line. I do own the game, after all.

Part of the reason I’m hesitant to commit to extra runs is because I have other games I’m looking at wanting to play. In most of my downtime I’ve been playing Apex Legends, and poke around in other games here and there, but I like to try and keep at least one game in the rotation that I can complete, Resident Evil 2 being that game for the moment. Next I’m looking at buying either Anthem or Devil May Cry 5, the latter of which is getting better reviews at the moment, but both carry a $60 price tag. I’d think completing DMC5 would be faster and it’s something I’d likely move on from after a single playthrough, and Anthem isn’t really a game you complete if it ends up even remotely like Destiny. Whatever the case I’m going to finish Resident Evil 2 before I buy another game. But that should be soon, and I should have something new to gush about shortly thereafter.

Whatever the case, the Resident Evil 2 Remake is fantastic, and you really should pick it up if you’re a fan of the series. The new additions make it feel like a modern game, but it still holds true to its classic roots, and I love that. Highly recommended!

Early Impressions: Resident Evil 2 Remake

Another full remake in the style of the recent Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy or the 2017 Shadow of the Colossus (we also know about Final Fantasy VII and Crash Team Racing re-dos coming soon), this year we finally get our hands on the treatment for Resident Evil 2. It’s not the first game in the series to be remade (there was a newer version of the original game created years ago), but it happens to be one of the strongest entries in the franchise, and when I first heard about this in 2016 I knew I’d want to play it. Unfortunately, due to moving and looking for work, I knew I wasn’t going to be able to get myself a copy when it first came out. I figured I’d wait for a sale and get it later on this year, but then my lovely woman gifted it to me for Valentine’s Day (thanks babe!).

Let me first note that I have only put in about 3-4 hours so far, so these are early impressions, but I can still elaborate on the pros and cons that I’ve seen so far.

1998 was a long time ago. I was sixteen when this game released, and probably a little bit older before I first played through it. You’ll have to excuse me if my memories of the original game are a little fuzzy. It’s likely that I’ll talk about not remembering something, or thinking something was different and perhaps it was just like the original. I have to say that the game feels new and different simply because the over the shoulder camera view from games 4-6 is back — a difference from the locked cameras of the original, and the latest game in the series that moved to first person camera. One thing that immediately stood out to me is the introduction. It feels completely new, as I don’t remember starting out at a gas station before hitting the Raccoon City Police Department; I just remember a short scene and then being there. Perhaps that’s just my memory playing tricks on me. The graphics are pretty amazing though. They’re similar enough to Resident Evil VII in quality, and as I said having the free look camera allows you to see all of the little details.

Before long you are at the front of the RPD, as expected. The game progresses from this point (and to the point I have played so far) as a sort of mixture of nostalgia and a whole new experience. We’ll go with “New Nostalgia.” The mood feels appropriately apprehensive but there haven’t been any jumpscares that I can recall. I’ve felt anxious for sure, but I sort of feel like I know what to expect at the same time.

The gore level seems to have been turned up a notch, even compared to some of the newer titles. Obviously they didn’t have the technology to pull off these visuals back in 1998, but even in the 2010’s games it didn’t look like this. I’m not put off by it, zombies aren’t exactly friendly and I want to feel the tension even if I am not jumping out of my seat.

What’s most familiar is the item box, typewriter and inventory/crafting systems. I remember spending plenty of time having to micro manage my inventory while exploring the game the first time around, and this remake is no exception. You’ll find keys, puzzle-solving items and supplies as you comb through the police station. Mixing herbs is back, and a new system for crafting bullets is in place. Your knife now serves the purpose of being able to directly slash enemies and get past certain barriers, it can also help you out of being grabbed by an enemy by giving you a counter attack. The police station feels familiar in that it looks to be laid out in a very similar fashion, and certain set pieces are reminiscent of the original. However, it does feel that this is a completely different place. My memory tells me to watch out for the Tyrant, and there will be parts outside of the police station, but I’m not sure if I’m mixing up my games at this point.

Whatever the case, I’m very happy with this remade edition of one of my favorite Resident Evil games. At this point I have just found the shotgun and encountered my first licker. Good times! I hope to be done with Leon’s campaign within a week and on to Claire’s after that. By then I should be able to afford a copy of Anthem! I’ll be back with more thoughts once I’ve completed the title.