The Steam Calculator: 2019 Edition

The first time The Steam Calculator was brought to my attention was back in 2014. At the time, I had only been purchasing games via the platform for a little while but it was still and interesting way to look at your Steam library. I’m a fan of stats and figures, so I guess this was a given. It just so happens that when I wrote that first post about my observations about said stats took place shortly after the first Newbie Blogger Initiative that I participated in. I also ended up writing a follow up post one year later and made some comparisons between the years. Seeing as how it is Blaugust and this topic popped up via other bloggers, I thought it was fitting to take a look at my account once again. It’s been just over five years since the original post, and four since the second so I’m sure my stats will have inflated quite a bit by now. I linked to both of those posts above but I will copy over some stats here for easy comparison. Let’s look at the numbers from the first post:

This account is worth $607.64. If all games were bought on sale, it would be $276.54.

* *Games owned:* 55

* *Games not played:* 5 **(9%)**

* *Hours spent:* 304.5h

I was surprised to find out how much time I had spent playing games on my Steam account at that time, given that I had mostly played MMOs and MOBAs via their own launchers up to that point, but I was heading towards critical backlog mass very shortly. Contrast with a year later:

This account is worth $2054. If all games were bought on sale, it would be $562.

* **Games owned:** 168
* **Games not played:** 34 *(20%)*
* **Hours on record:** 660.0h*
* **Average price of games owned:** $12.22
* **Average price per hour:** $9.86
* **Average playtime:** 4.9h

I went more in depth in my stats analysis in the prior post, but we can see an almost $1500 spike in account value, over 100 new games added and more than double the amount of hours spent on the platform. Let’s fast forward and see what’s going on, current day:

This account is worth $5195. If all games were bought on sale, it would be $1410.

* **Games owned:** 416
* **Games not played:** 90 *(22%)*
* **Hours on record:** 1569h*
* **Average price of games owned:** $15.93
* **Average price per hour:** $8.19
* **Average playtime:** 4.8h

So first of all, wow that’s a lot of money for only three years. $3.1k is no small figure, but I guarantee you that very little of my library was purchased for full price. I rarely buy games that aren’t on sale, and have trained myself to wait for the semi-annual sales that occur. I’ve also tried to cull my backlog by playing games until I beat them or decide that I never will, and then they get uninstalled. This has been an ongoing project of mine, but it is difficult to keep up with as new games are releasing all of the time and I end up getting new ones still, but it’s been much less often in the last couple of years. This is most likely due to splitting my free cash between gaming and MTG, but also due to expenses varying over the years. Looks like I have a ton of games that aren’t played but I know that I’ve played most. I think it’s still counting DLC and/or Free to Play games that I don’t really own. It has been noted that this database isn’t 100% accurate, but it’s still fun to look at. It appears that my average price of games, price per hour and average playtime haven’t changed much in four years. I’d attribute this to my schedule, having a family, work, and all of that good stuff. I’m in a good place with it, so that’s what matters.

If you’re curious about your own Steam accounts, you can find that app over here.

The Steam Calculator: One Year Later

This post was inspired by Aywren’s look at her progress through the Steam Personal Challenge, which was going around the blogosphere around this time last year. I jumped on board with a post about the Steam Calculator, in which I took a look at various stats based on my Steam account. From that post, some stats for comparison:

This account is worth $607.64. If all games were bought on sale, it would be $276.54.

* *Games owned:* 55

* *Games not played:* 5 **(9%)**

* *Hours spent:* 304.5h

Keep in mind, at the time I had just gotten my hands on a computer that was capable of playing most games on the market, and at this point I actually have a far superior gaming PC, so those numbers were all fairly low, but I’m just using the facts for a comparison with this year’s results. It seems that some upgrades have been made to the Steam database page itself, as this year there is more information, or maybe I just left bits out last year. Either way, we’ll start with the side by side comparison. Extra facts to follow.

This account is worth $2054. If all games were bought on sale, it would be $562.

* **Games owned:** 168
* **Games not played:** 34 *(20%)*
* **Hours on record:** 660.0h

As you can see, there’s been a considerable jump between both stat sheets. I’ve tripled the amount of games owned, have a higher percentage of games not played, and have added 360 hours of gameplay. However, some of this information is still skewed, and the calculator developers have said that the Steam API is funky and they can’t explain it away. For instance, all of the Total War games were free to try this past weekend, and they are showing up in my library and are counted towards in that 20% not played. Take those away and the percentage should be something more like 15%, because I very rarely get a game and don’t immediately try it out. However, there are exceptions. Sequels to games I haven’t beaten (Like F.E.A.R.’s sequels that I got in a bundle) will sit unplayed. I picked up Borderlands: The PreSequel a couple of months ago but was already mid-playthrough of another game so it’s been sitting. I do know my backlog needs work but I do slowly but surely get through them as time allows. It doesn’t help that I spend a bunch of hours on MOBAs, MMOs, and console games. Netflix and the DVR eats a bunch of time too.

Anyway, there are some other stats that I found interesting as well, that are now included (or I missed in the past) on the profile.

* **Average price of games owned:** $12.22
* **Average price per hour:** $9.86
* **Average playtime:** 4.9h

I’m not sure how they calculate this average price, because there is a huge discrepancy between the $2k price tag and the $500 sale price. Because I’m relatively cheap there are few games that I picked up for full price, meaning my total cost overall is probably somewhere between the two figures, and I’d wager it’s probably around $6-700. The average price per hour is a breakdown of what the game actually costs based on how many hours you put into it. Looking at that price per hour, it feels like I’m getting ripped off, but there’s a number of titles I have that were gifts, I picked up for free, or were parts of bundles so I got them for pennies on the dollar. The game I have with the most hours put into it was Awesomenauts at 160, and that breaks down to $.06 per hour, which is definitely cost effective. I think more games end up being more cost effective like this, because as we’ve discussed, the stats are entirely accurate or specific. The worst example is RPG Maker VX Ace, in which it shows I have about an hour put into the software, and the price is $70. However, I picked it up in a Humble Bundle for $1. So yeah, you can see where this isn’t entirely reliable but it’s still interesting to look at.

In conclusion, it seems that I’ve kept up pretty well with getting new games and actually playing them. I do know that most of those are still in need of completion though, despite being “played.” I have a good grasp on what my backlog entails and have a plan to keep playing MMOs, MOBAs, and other games that don’t necessarily have a win condition, along with playing through a single player game til completion before moving on to another. It’s been working, my last completed game being Shadow Warrior, and I’m currently working through Fallout: New Vegas.

How’s your account looking?

#steamcalculator #steampersonalchallenge #gaming #backlog

The Steam Calculator

Since the NBI was still running its annual event, there was talk about the backlogs gamers can end up with. I actually threw the topic out as a discussion piece during the event, but despite a lot of participants, I never did write my own post on the subject. Since then, a more recent topic has cropped up surrounding the Steam Calculator, and a personal challenge to actually play games we buy on Steam. Much of the discussion revolved around the fact that people tend to buy a bunch of games during Steams holiday sales and then never play them.

This also ties in nicely with a project I’ve been meaning to work on, and I think I mentioned it once before. If not, I’ll mention it now. I wanted to catalog all of the games I have across all platforms, including physical copies, and do something much like what the Steam Calculator does. I wanted to know the kind of money I had spent, the amount of games I own, and which ones I had yet to complete. Having this nifty Steam Calculator solves part of the equation, but I’ll have to manually do the research for the info regarding other platforms. This is something I have resolved to do, so you can expect further commentary on the subject once I piece together the rest of the information.

For now, I’ll focus on the Steam side of things. Let me just say that compared to some of the other people who have posted similarly, I have done pretty well when it comes to my Steam account. Let’s break it down, shall we?

This account is worth $607.64. If all games were bought on sale, it would be $276.54.

That’s a high figure, even a the sale price. I think when all was said and done, It might be in the ballpark of $200 spent. However, most people have already figured that DLC doesn’t seem to count, and some prices are applied when you paid the sale price, etc. Of the games it says I “own,” 17 are free to play and 2 are “not in store.” So obviously I don’t own those games, nor did I pay for them. Most I didn’t play for very long either.

* *Games owned:* 55

* *Games not played:* 5 **(9%)**

* *Hours spent:* 304.5h

So obviously I don’t own 55 games, and my actual profile page says it’s 39. I’m no math whiz, but 55 – 39 = 16, so who knows what is going on there. Of those games though, there’s only 5 I haven’t played. Two of those are RPG Maker made games that came in the Humble Bundle I got probably a month ago. I don’t know that I’ll ever play those, they were kind of a package deal. One was a free to play game I just downloaded last night and haven’t gotten around to trying (it might also be instantly removed). The only game that’s on there that I truly haven’t played and probably should have is Overlord II. The problem there is that I started on the first game, never finished it, and didn’t want to start up the sequel having not finished the original. I’m weird like that. It’s why I haven’t played Bioshock 2 or Infinite, because I never finished the first game (and I don’t own a copy, despite having the other two). So perhaps that is something that I need to remedy.

Finally, there are games on there with hours played, but that I haven’t completed. I already started my own steam challenge of sorts when I held a community poll a while back, and my readers voted for a playthrough of Shadowrun Returns. I finished that playthrough and moved onto the expansion since, but was planning to either have another vote or move onto another game in the backlog anyway. So overall, I do have some games that need played (or finished), but I’m not as bad off as some members of the community.

With that said, I do want to catalog my PS3 library (particularly the digital portion) and make a list up of the games I need to play/finish there as well. That would give me a larger picture and the ability to plan this out to be more efficient. Despite my bitching about wanting some new MMO to come along and sweep me off my feet, it’s probably a good thing I’m not devoting all of my game time to one at the moment. I’d be missing out on a lot of other experiences (for better or worse).

Did you need to challenge yourself?

#steamchallenge #steamcalculator #gaming